Water is at the center of the crisis in the Bay Area

As drought drives prices higher, millions of Californians struggle to pay for water, sewer and other services. Meanwhile, the state’s economy remains in jeopardy.

“This is a critical time, and water is at the center of it. We’ve never had to be this hard on these consumers, and so I’m grateful that we in the Legislature acted on these issues.”

The average price for water has risen by more than a quarter in the last year. Meanwhile, many in the Bay Area are trying to make ends meet. And water is at the center of it.

“This is a critical time, and water is at the center of it. We’ve never had to be this hard on these consumers, and so I’m grateful that we in the Legislature acted on these issues.”

Assemblyman Tom Ammiano — a Democrat representing portions of Contra Costa County — said the crisis is real. While he agrees water shortages are occurring in his region, he said the Legislature must act to help alleviate the issue.

“It’s not just something that happens when the temperatures get too hot. It’s something that happens when there’s too much demand and too little water,” he said. “This is a serious problem, and the Legislature should take action.”

State Sen. Steve Glazer — a Democrat representing the state’s agricultural heartland in the central and southern parts of the state — said the problem is not just a drought. It’s a crisis, in part, because of population growth.

“The water supply is not sufficient, and that’s a true crisis,” said Glazer, a member of the Senate Agriculture and Water Committee. “The demand is greater than the supply. You have to address that.”

Glazer said he plans to introduce legislation that would establish an emergency drought fund of up to $450 million. His measure also creates a program to replace and repair water lines — but it doesn’t create an emergency fund, which would require a vote by the Legislature

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